Baseball romance in time for the World Series!

You may know that I am a huge baseball fan. Game 1 of the World Series is tonight, which is very exciting! And you may have wandered over to this website thinking, “I heard Kate wrote that baseball romance, what was it called again?”

So, SURE, this is a promo post with an obvious tie-in to a current event, but this is also my website, so here you go. Here’s a primer on my baseball books if you want some baseball romance reading!

Out in the Field
Matt Blanco is at the twilight of his career and Iggy Rodrigquez is at the beginning of his on the World Champion Brooklyn Eagles. It’s romance, it’s Major League Baseball, and everyone gets a happy ending!

“One Man to Remember” in Playing Ball
Baseball in the Jazz Age! A Major League player in the Babe Ruth era falls for a flamboyant sportscaster.

Four Corners
This novel is not about baseball per se, but it is about four guys who played baseball as kids (they were the four corners of the baseball diamond) and the romance between Jake (the one who stayed) and Adam (the one who left). There’s a lot of baseball talk, though, and a tension-filled scene at the batting cages!

“What There Is”
This little novella is about a retired professional baseball player who needs a place to stay, and ends up finding love with his geeky roommate.

Thrown a CurveAnd finally, the Rainbow League series, which is about an LGBT amateur baseball league in NYC.
The Windup
Anxious Ian is back in NYC after fleeing a traumatic childhood and intends to leave just as soon as he makes sure his ailing mother is ok, but then he joins the Rainbow League and meets Ty, who may just persuade him to stay.

Thrown a Curve
Retired Yankee Mason came out in a very public way and still struggles to find acceptance in his own family. Meeting flashy hairdresser Patrick doesn’t make that much easier. And yet…

The Long Slide Home
Childhood friends Nate and Carlos save each other from some difficult times and become more than friends along the way. This one’s a bit of a slow burn, but it wraps up a series-long arc, so I recommend reading all 3 books in order.

The baseball season begins!

Baseball MondaysThe baseball season has just begun! So here’s a bonus Baseball Monday!

If you’ve been around these parts, you may be aware of the fact that I am a huge baseball fan. My sister-in-law had a good insight regarding that recently. In New York, since we have two teams to choose from, she said that whoever was winning more when you were twelve is your team. This is not exactly true in my case—the Yankees sucked when I was twelve—but I did go to my first Yankee game when I was twelve (and they lost, badly, to the Orioles, but it was such a great experience that it kind of imprinted itself on my psyche).

I recently re-watched Ken Burns’s documentary Baseball, and I’ll say, if anyone is ever wondering, “Why does Kate like this sport so much?” watch it to find out. Even if you just watch The Tenth Inning (a follow-up documentary Burns put out a few years ago; the original first aired in 1994), you’ll see “the key years of Kate’s fandom” (the ’90s and ’00s) and my team’s great triumphs (Aaron Boone’s home run to win the 2003 ALCS) and defeats (the Red Sox coming from behind to win the 2004 ALCS and ultimately win the World Series). The documentary is fantastic, and I highly recommend it if you’re even a tiny bit interested in baseball (and have a good number of hours on your hand, because it’s long).

So, hey! Have you caught up with my baseball books? There’s the whole Rainbow League series, about the guys who play for an amateur league. There’s Out in the Field, the story of two Major League ballplayers who fall in love. There’s “One Man to Remember,” my historical novella about a player in Babe Ruth’s shadow in 1927. Four Corners is about four old friends who played baseball together (though the story is really more baseball adjacent). And “What There Is” is a novella about a former ballplayer who falls for his new roommate.

The beginning of the baseball season is great because it’s fresh and new and the prospects for your team always seem positive. Anything can happen! So happy spring and happy baseball!!

2014 Rainbow Awards!

Wow! I’m so honored to have received the following:

WinnerMD Winner! The Playing Ball anthology I worked in with Shae Connor, Marguerite Labbe, and Kerry Freeman won first place in the LGBT anthology category! The anthology features my first foray into historical, “One Man to Remember,” a romance between a rookie baseball player and a sports reporter set in the Jazz Age.

I’ve been a runner-up before but never a winner. It is pretty fantastic to share the win with my fellow baseball-fan writers and friends! The anthology was a lot of fun to put together. I’m beside myself that it won the award.

HonorableMentionSM The Silence of the Stars won an honorable mention (that means the book received a score of 36 or above (out of 40) from at least one judge).

It was also the runner up (10th place) for the The William Neale Award for Best Gay Contemporary Romance. That was a big, tough category—many really amazing books!—and I’m thrilled to have made the list of finalists.

Bonus: I was a judge for Lesbian Contemporary General Fiction, and this was also a pretty strong field. If you’re looking for a good lesbian read, you can’t really go wrong with any of these.

Here are all the winners! Congratulations to all!

Awards Season!

By now you’ve probably heard that the Rainbow Awards were announced over the weekend.

Runner-UpMD

I’m happy to announce that Show and Tell was one of the runner-ups for Best Gay Paranormal. It was an honor just to be a finalist, and I mean that honestly; there was a lot of stiff competition from some really excellent writers.

Also, the Goodreads M/M Group is having their Member Choice Awards voting right now. I’m up for two awards:

Best_Anthology.N

for Playing Ball

Best_Perform_Arts.N

for The Stars that Tremble

Details are at the Goodreads group.

…And this is me Snoopy dancing. That’s a nice cap to a great year.

Playing Ball blog tour week 1 highlights

The anthology is out! Order here!

I posted an excerpt of my historical story One Man to Remember. For excerpts of the other stories, check out the websites of my co-conspirators: Marguerite Labbe, Shae Connor, and Kerry Freeman. We’ve put together a pretty stellar anthology if I do say so myself.

Marguerite and I discussed the greatest baseball rivalry of all time at the Armchair Reader. (That’s Yankees vs. Red Sox. I bet you can guess which side of that I fall on.)

And today, I wrote about why we love sports romances for Elisa’s blog.

And don’t forget you can enter the Rafflecopter Giveaway for a few cool prizes.

Playing Ball Blog Tour: “One Man to Remember” Excerpt

playingballtourbannerNew York City, 1927

Walt leaned against the brick facade of a Times Square building and watched Babe Ruth get out of a cab. The Bambino was wearing a clean white suit with a matching fedora tilted at a jaunty angle. Walt always found the contradiction of Ruth—the expensive clothes on the odd, triangular body, with the craggy face that looked like it had been in too many bar brawls—to be quite interesting. But there were plenty of reporters in New York dying to follow Ruth around. Walt had another story to pursue.

The Penguin Club was around the corner. It wasn’t Walt’s favorite Times Square establishment. It was a little bland, but that was why he’d chosen it—it was safe. He couldn’t imagine a kid like Skip would do well in the sorts of places Walt really liked to go. He was skittish in the baseball stadium; Walt couldn’t imagine him calm in one of the racier clubs.

He pulled his fedora down over his eyes and slunk down Fifty-Sixth Street. The Penguin was a little off the beaten path—another reason Walt had chosen it—and tonight, Walt wanted to fade into the background a bit, to observe instead of be observed.

He spotted a figure walking down the street from Sixth Avenue and knew immediately it was Skip. He walked with a dancer’s grace, something Walt had noticed at the stadium. As he came closer, Walt saw he was wearing a brown suit a couple of seasons out of style and a battered bowler hat that didn’t really go with the suit. These were forgivable offenses, Walt decided, since he did look pretty great out of a baseball uniform.

“Why, Mr. Littlefield,” Walt said as Skip walked up to him. “You’re a real sheik outside of the ballpark.”

It was too dark to see if Skip was blushing, but Walt imagined from the way he ducked his head that he was.

“I’m still not really sure about this,” Skip said.

“One measly drink won’t do any harm.”

Walt gestured for Skip to follow him. He knew the password, although the door was being watched by a big six named Anthony, with whom Walt had once had a brief and tawdry affair. Luckily, they were still on good terms.

“How are ya, Walt?” Anthony greeted him.

“I’m just ducky. This is my friend John.”

Skip tilted his head, but then extended a hand to Anthony, who shook it.

Anthony said, “You boys can go on in. Although, Walt? If you’re looking for something to do later, Carmela’s performing at that little place off Forty-Third tonight.”

Walt nodded. He loved Carmela’s show, but he was sort of wishing this interview would go long enough for him to miss it. And he certainly knew better than to think Skip would be interested in a show like Carmela’s. “I’ll keep that in mind,” Walt said.

As Walt led Skip into the speakeasy, Skip said, “Who is Carmela?”

Walt chuckled. “Would it terrify you if I told you she is a female impersonator?”

Skip tilted his head again, as if he were taking that in. “Like a man in a dress?”

Playing BallWalt nodded. “Carmela is in fact an Italian fella named Carmine who I’ve known for years. He’s… well, he’s something, to be sure. But his brother owns a bunch of the Times Square establishments, plus a few other places downtown, so he has plenty of performance venues.”

Skip seemed more intrigued by this than put off, which was not the reaction Walt had been expecting. “What does he do in his show?”

“Dances, tells jokes, that sort of thing. Like a one-man vaudeville act. Why do you ask? Do you want to see it?”

Skip shrugged. “Just wondering.”

What an interesting man Skip was turning out to be. The lack of literacy had given Walt pause back at the stadium. Walt’s handwriting wasn’t so abysmal that it couldn’t be deciphered, so Skip’s hesitancy over the words said a lot. But he still had found the place. Asking about school was on Walt’s agenda for this evening. He didn’t know much about Skip except that he was very attractive—he had a round face with a narrow nose and surprisingly plump lips atop that athletic body, and as he removed his hat, he displayed a thick head of wavy blond hair—and he played baseball as well as or better than many of the best ballplayers in the city. He was also, apparently, barely literate and intrigued by the idea of a show like Carmela’s. Walt was fascinated.

Playing Ball will be available September 25th (tomorrow!) from Dreamspinner Press. Pre-Order the book here!

Cover Reveal: Playing Ball Anthology

Playing BallI am thrilled to show off the gorgeous cover for the Playing Ball anthology, which will be available on September 25.

My story is called “One Man to Remember.”

It’s 1927, and in New York City Babe Ruth and the Yankee’s unstoppable batting lineup, Murderers’ Row, is all anyone can talk about. Across town, the Giants’ rookie infielder Skip Littlefield racks up hits, creating a streak to rival the Babe’s. Worried his secrets could get out, he avoids the spotlight, but he catches the attention of lauded sports reporter Walter Selby, a notorious dandy whose sexuality is an open secret. Skip reluctantly agrees to an interview, and mutual attraction is sparked. Skip can only hope the more charismatic stars will draw attention away from his romance with Walt. Otherwise, his career and everything he loves is at stake.

The book is now available for preorder from the Dreamspinner site: ebook or print.

five things on friday makes a triumphant return

Weekly wrap-up!

1. I skipped doing my five things post last week, because aside from the triumphant release of What There Is, I didn’t have a lot going on. Not so this week! I have been so very busy! But, hey, I had a novella come out last week, and that is no small feat. (Check out the story! There are boys. There is Brooklyn. And, yes, there’s even baseball.)

2. I went to Lady Jane’s Salon on Monday and bought two books even though I do not need any more books. It was funny, actually; I almost didn’t go because I was having trouble summoning the energy to drag myself from Brooklyn to Manhattan, but going was definitely the correct decision, because I had a blast. Seriously, if you are ever near a Lady Jane’s, GO.

3. Wednesday, I went to a class at the Brooklyn Brainery (conveniently located right in my neighborhood). It was called Great New York City Buildings Few Guide Books Will Ever Mention. It was fun, basically an architect’s take on which buildings in New York are the most interesting. The choices were all pretty obscure, including this oddball building in Brooklyn.

4. I saw cover drafts for both of my fall books this week. That’s always a fun part of the publishing process.

Oh, and I have pub dates! The baseball anthology Playing Ball will be out 9/25 and my opera novel The Stars that Tremble is tentatively schedule to come out on 9/30. So it will be a Kateriffic September. (And, good news: print copies of both should be available for signing at GRL.)

5. I want to read all the gay historical romances. (I just finished The Gentleman’s Keeper by Bonnie Dee and Summer Devon and loved it.) Any recs?

5 things on friday are coming soon

I usually use this space to wrap-up my week, talking about 5 things I’ve been doing or reading or thinking about. Since I’ve had a not terribly exciting week, I thought I would instead talk about 5 writing projects I’m working on. Most of these are not contracted yet, so these are like sneaky-sneaky previews of what you may see in 2014 and 2015.

1. Let’s get the upcoming publications out of the way first. Due out this fall from Dreamspinner:

One Man to Remember—[part of the Playing Ball anthology I’m doing with Shae Connor, Kerry Freeman, and Marguerite Labbe (2/3 of whom I got to see in Atlanta last week!] This is a historical novella set in 1927 (my first published historical, you guys!) in which a talented but media-shy rookie falls in love with a flamboyant sports reporter.

The Stars that Tremble—Here’s hoping readers feel about opera the same way they did about baseball—this is an emotional opposites attract romance between a former opera star and a contractor who renovates kitchens.

More detailed blurbs for both of these are available on the upcoming page.

2. I’ve written here before about how I suck at writing sequels. I often sit down to write one, get 5 or 6,000 words into it, and then lose all interest. Books for which I have done this: I started a sequel to In Hot Pursuit in which one hero is Noah’s police partner and is tasked with tracking down Harry’s infant nephew while also hooking up with a sexy FBI agent; Neal from The Boy Next Door was always supposed to have his own book, but I don’t have it quite right yet; there’s a sequel to Blind Items in which Drew and Rey produce a play together and there’s a subplot about the lead actor. After I kept crashing and burning with the TBND sequel, I swore off sequels, but people were clamoring for something after Blind Items. (And I get it. The book ends at a specific moment and I thought the story was over, but after the fact I regretted not writing an epilogue. Things work out for Drew and Jonathan! I promise!)

Anyhoo. Here we are again. I put a character in The Stars that Tremble named Sandy, and he sort of took over every scene he’s in, and I cannot deny that the epilogue is deliberately kind of sequel-bait-y, and… well, you’ll see. And then every single person, from betas to editors, who has breathed near the manuscript has been like, “When does Sandy get his own book? I want that yesterday!” So, fine, Sandy is getting his own book. I’ve written about 10,000 words of it so far. So I broke the 6K wall!

The gist: Sandy is a veteran of the global war on terror. He received a medical discharge from the army after he took some shrapnel to the should when he ran into a car bomb in Afghanistan. (I think. I’m still kind of working out this part.) So he’s got some PTSD but is in deep denial about having PTSD and he uses humor and his sunny personality to deflect attention from the fact that he’s hurting pretty badly inside. He meets a super hot violinist named Everett and they start fucking and it’s supposed to just be fun until feelings get involved. And then we have some sweet, delicious conflict.

I think the world of the Olcott School, where Gio from The Stars that Tremble and Everett from the unnamed sequel are both teachers, could be ripe for stories. There could be a New Adult story involving musical prodigies, for example. Lots of possibilities! So we’ll see about that.

3. I’m finishing up a Jazz Age historical about a vaudeville dancer and a mid-level Mob boss that’s a lot darker than the stuff I usually write. I’m so glad I’m in the home stretch with this one, because I’ve been working on it for a couple of years now. (So much research! Although that’s part of why I was able to write One Man to Remember quickly; I had a lot of the period research in my brain already.) I don’t have a title yet, and this has been the source of much contemplation and agony on my part, but soon, my pretties, soon I will have something more to say about that, I hope.

4. I started writing this crazy contemporary about a month ago that’s an angsty friends-to-lovers set in New York. It has some Unpopular Themes. I feel like this is my, “Just as everyone started complaining about Trope 1 and Trope 2 in romance novel, I got this plot bunny that includes all of them!” novel. So!

5. At RWA, I attended a workshop taught by two of my favorite authors, Eloisa James and Sarah MacLean, on writing series, which I’ve never seriously attempted but very much want to. I mentioned as much to Damon Suede later that evening, and he was like, “You’re the baseball girl. You should write a baseball series.” And then we ran with that. So on Tuesday, I bought a new notebook and started mapping out what I want the series to look like. I think the only way to do this successfully is to actually plan at least the first three books. And because I’m a plotter and NOT a pantser, I plan to outline those suckers first. So I’ve got part of an outline for the first book in a series about a gay amateur baseball league.

So that is the state of my WIPs!